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The Emma Press has just published a sumptuous anthology of poems about homesickness and exile, inspired by the Roman poet Ovid’s Tristia.

Homesickness and Exile, published on 18th September 2014, is a collection of poems about leaving and finding home, from the perspective of those who leave as well as those left behind. Many of the poems consider the difficulty of identifying a ‘home’ within various conflicting signifiers, including where you were born, where your parents are from, where you grew up and where you live now. The book was edited by Rachel Piercey and Emma Wright and it includes illustrations and an introduction by Emma Wright.

Inside ‘Homesickness and Exile’

Publisher Emma Wright said: ‘The idea for the anthology came from the Tristia, a set of poems written by the Roman poet Ovid after he was banished from Rome by the emperor Augustus. We wanted to create a book which reflected modern feelings about homesickness, drawing parallels between an ancient Roman man yearning for his home two thousand years ago and people writing about the idea of home today.’

The poems in Homesickness and Exile were selected from the poems sent in response to an open call for submissions at the end of 2013, which resulted over 200 entries. The final selection features twenty-eight poets from across the world, including Dubai, Greece, America, Australia and New Zealand.

Publisher Emma Wright said: ‘We were thrilled with the response we had to our call for submissions, as it confirmed that the subject matter struck a deep chord with people and it meant we were able to select poems with a wide range of approaches and perspectives. We wanted to make the kind of book which people could give to imminent travellers, to keep them company on the road.’

Four poets from Homesickness and Exile will be reading at a special National Poetry Day event at the Story Museum in Oxford on Thursday 2nd October. Holly Hopkins, Selina Nwulu, Stephen Sexton and Anja Konig will perform their poems from the anthology as well as others on the theme of ‘Rembembering Home’. For more details, please visit the Story Museum website.

Read more about Homesickness and Exile here. You can buy the printed book and the ebook over on our webshop.

The Emma Press has announced a new call for poems about ‘slow things’ to coincide with their latest publication, The Dead Snail Diaries by Jamie McGarry. The Dead Snail Diaries is the posthumous debut from a Scarborough snail who met an untimely end one night in 2009 under the foot of human poet Jamie McGarry.

McGarry’s discovery of a tiny journal at the scene of the snail’s demise suggested a means by which he could atone for his carelessness. In McGarry’s own words, ‘I knew what I had to do: write up the contents of the diary in English, maintaining the snail’s original form (usually poetic) wherever possible, and distribute it as widely as I could, so that humanity might better understand our slimy, shell-dwelling neighbours.’

Publisher Emma Wright acquired The Dead Snail Diaries for the Emma Press in summer 2013 and has since worked closely with McGarry on creating a fitting tribute to the snail. She said: ‘We plan to launch The Dead Snail Diaries slowly, over the course of a year, with a series of low-key readings at festivals and allotments. We’re also encouraging other poets to engage with the snail’s pace of life, with a new call for submissions for Slow Things.’

The publisher has released details of Slow Things on their submissions page, inviting poems about ‘slow creatures, slow humans, slow activities, slow processes, slow moments in time, slow cookers, slow art. The slow march of history. Anything as long as it’s slow.’ Poets can send in up to three poems and must be members of the Emma Press Club, whereby they must have bought a book from the publisher’s website within this calendar year. The deadline for submissions is 26th October 2014 and the anthology is scheduled for release in spring 2016.

* Read more about The Dead Snail Diaries. * Read more about the call for submissions to Slow Things.

The Emma Press has launched a call for poems about UK politics in the run-up to the General Election, as well as a call for poems about voting.

The poems about UK politics will be published as Campaign in Poetry and the voting poems as The Emma Press Anthology of Voting. The independent publisher is calling for poems about ‘the Coalition, MPs, party politics, party leaders, the election campaigns and the rise of UKIP and the far Right’ for Campaign in Poetry and ‘poems about the history of voting, its present role in people’s lives across the world, and about voting in all contexts’ for The Emma Press Anthology of Voting. The independent publisher hopes the call for submissions will elicit poems written from a wide range of viewpoints.

Publisher Emma Wright said: ‘Contrary to what Jeremy Paxman believes, contemporary poets are very engaged with current affairs and I’m confident that we’ll get some fascinating responses to both of the briefs. The title Campaign in Poetry is inspired by a quote from New York politician Mario Cuomo, who said ‘You campaign in poetry. You govern in prose.’ We hope our own Campaign in Poetry will be a statement against disaffection, providing an alternative perspective on the political landscape of our country, and The Emma Press Anthology of Voting will be a fascinating exploration of attitudes to democracy across the world.’

The Emma Press has recently published anthologies of poems about motherhood and fatherhood, and anthologies about homesickness and female friendship are forthcoming in the autumn. For more details about how to submit to Campaign in Poetry and The Emma Press Anthology of Voting, visit the Submissions page.

About The Emma Press The Emma Press is an independent publisher dedicated to producing books which are sweet, funny and beautiful. It was founded in 2012 in Winnersh, UK, by former Orion Books employee Emma Wright and the first Emma Press book, The Flower and the Plough, by Rachel Piercey, was published in January 2013. The Emma Press was awarded funding from the National Lottery through Arts Council England to run the 10-date Mildly Erotic Poetry Tour around the UK in Autumn 2013, to coincide with the publication of The Emma Press Anthology of Mildly Erotic Verse. Read more about The Emma Press here.

The Emma Press has formed an alliance with Valley Press, another small publisher, and from now on we will be sharing a blog! I will continue to update the ‘News’ section of my site with bulletins about Emma Press books and events, but for more detailed updates and musings please head over to the brand-new Emma Valley Blog. Valley Press publisher Jamie McGarry and I will be posting about our respective businesses, books, and opinions about publishing, as well as some book reviews.

You can read more about our union here, or read about how it all came about here.

The Keen Bean, a tiny coffee shop in Oxford run by poet and entrepreneur Will Davies, has just started a series of free poetry nights to promote small and independent publishers. Will was kind enough to invite me to curate the first event and I leapt at the chance; I’ve been planning some events to coincide with the publication of The Emma Press Anthology of Mildly Erotic Verse from September onwards and I was glad to be able to try some ideas out in front of a small audience.

The event, which took place on Saturday 3rd August, was a two-hander featuring Rachel and Richard, both friends of The Emma Press. Here are the introductions I wrote for the Keen Bean event page …

Richard O’Brien reading

Richard O’Brien is one of the most exciting and in-demand young poets around, popping up most recently at the BBC Proms. He won the Foyle Young Poets of the Year award in 2006 and 2007, and his debut pamphlet, your own devices, has almost completely sold out. He has a second pamphlet coming out in the autumn with Dead Ink, as well as one scheduled for January 2014 with The Emma Press.

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Rising star Rachel Piercey was President of the Oxford University Poetry Society and won the Newdigate Prize in 2008. She writes beautiful, lucid poetry and her illustrated pamphlet of love poems, The Flower and the Plough, was published by The Emma Press earlier this year. Last month she joined the editorial team on Cadaverine Magazine.

The Keen Bean pamphlets

With a line-up like that, I was pretty confident about how the poetry side of things was going to go, but I also felt pressure to hold up my end of proceedings. I made some hand-stitched pamphlets, so the poets wouldn’t have to shuffle bits of paper around on stage, and I planned an informal speech explaining the origins of the press. The Keen Bean had the intimate atmosphere sorted already, so all that was left was the running order. At the suggestion of Rachel, I organised her and Richard’s poems into alternating chunks of 2-5 poems, designed to work as individual segments but also to speak to the preceding and following mini-sets.

Rachel Piercey next to my banner

Richard and Rachel, as it turns out, have very complementary styles. Richard approaches his subjects with great intensity and depth while Rachel has a sparer touch, drawing out her often startling observations with deceptive simplicity. They share a love of form and a nice line in almost masochistic emotional honesty, and watching them alternate was like taking a too-deep breath in and then puffing it out too fast: both giddying and intense experiences, but in different ways. They were brilliant on Saturday, and I really hope we can put on this show again so more people can see it. The whole event went as well as I had hoped it would, not least due to the relaxed charm of the Keen Bean and Will Davies himself.

As mentioned above, there will be many more Emma Press events taking place from September onwards, so do sign up to the newsletter and keep an eye out for announcements on Facebook and Twitter. These will involve lots of the poets from the Mildly Erotic Anthology (available for pre-order here) and will be completely amazing, so start getting excited … now! If you wish you’d been at the Keen Bean event, you can check out the setlist below and even read some of the poems for yourself.

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The setlist:

Richard O’Brien Rachel Piercey

Scintillometry Songs about Louise Desire Path

At the arcade The corps Lilac tree Boys who take traffic cones Sea bed

More Sharks Than Ever Before Actaeon Munch’s Cock

On Rosebery Avenue Bath time Truth or dare

Ransom The Smell of Apples Orpheus

Know not me Ride Tonight, Matthew…

Magician’s Assistant Victorian Pornography

Family tree Symbiosis

If you were just kicking yourself for not having made it down to Lower Marsh Market during office hours on a Friday recently, then stop kicking yourself. I’ve been enjoying the market very much, so you now have another month in which to wander down and get your hands on some poetry books which you might otherwise have had to order online, or maybe never seen at all. These are beautiful, tactile objects, so I would recommend strongly against forgoing this experience – these books have to be seen and felt to be believed, and where better to browse than in a sunny street in South London under a gazebo presided over by ME?

NEW DATES:

Friday 12th July, 11am – 4pm Friday 19th July, 11am – 4pm Friday 26th July, 11am – 4pm Friday 2nd August, 11am – 4pm

As for the kinds of books I have to offer, there is of course The Emma Press’s The Flower and the Plough, resplendent in pink, and also a variety of books from the following independent poetry publishers:

Donut Press. Donut Press has been producing beautiful poetry pocketbooks since 2001, when book-selling colleagues Andy Ching (editorial) and Liam Relph (design) joined forces to create a small publishing dream team. They are based in Devon and are publishing Murder Bear, by W.N. Herbert in the autumn.

Sidekick Books. Sidekick Books was founded in 2009 by Jon Stone and Kirsten Irving, both award-winning poets. They publish anthologies with themes as diverse as Japanese monsters and British birds. They are currently working on Coin Opera II, a poetry anthology about video games, which was funded through a successful Kickstarter campaign.

Valley Press. Valley Press is a dynamic Yorkshire-based publishing house, founded by writer and poet Jamie McGarry in 2008. Valley Press recently published the poetry produced by official Glastonbury Festival poet-in-residence Kate Fox and will be publishing an anthology of the winning short stories from The Big Issue In The North New Writing Award.

So the number of people who regularly buy poetry books is decreasing. On the other hand, the population of the earth is on the up. The way I see it, there’s everything to play for. With that in mind, I will be running a poetry stall at Lower Marsh Market from Friday 14th June, selling The Flower and the Plough and a variety of Emma Press cards and postcards. I am also delighted to be selling books from a few other independent poetry publishers whose work I admire. These are:

Donut Press, a Devon-based independent press run by Andy Ching and Liam Relph

Sidekick Books, a poetry press run by Jon Stone and Kirsten Irving in London

Valley Press, a literary publisher based in Scarborough and run by Jamie McGarry

I’ll be presenting the poetry books as ‘the perfect gift,’ both for other people and as a personal treat to oneself on a Friday afternoon. They are all beautifully-designed and presented, and at £5 – 10 for potential mind-blowing and bliss-inducing language, cheap at the price.

I want to challenge the idea that poetry is inaccessible or ‘difficult,’ and that you need a literature degree to understand and appreciate it. Some poetry is difficult and inaccessible, but it’s difficult and inaccessible to everyone. At its best, poetry can be comforting, challenging and life-enhancing, sometimes all at once, and its place should be in everyday life, not just in English lessons and the rare moments when one has psyched oneself up to really concentrate.

The Flower and the Plough on sale

I hope the gift-shop context will help with this, and to bring the idea home I’ve challenged some artists I know to produce affordable (£10) art squares inspired by a selection of poems and lines I picked out. Sometimes a way into poetry can be through a line or phrase that speaks to you, so I hope by isolating some of these and representing them in prints or sketches or stitches that people will be encouraged to look up the full source poems.

I can’t wait to have all the books and art squares laid out in front of me, and I’ll be updating my Facebook and Twitter pages with news from the market and my responses to the books from other publishers. If you’re in London on any of the dates, do come by and say hello. Lower Marsh is just behind Waterloo, so it’s very accessible, and you can grab a drink at my favourite bar while you’re there too.

Dates (11am – 4pm each day): Friday 14th June Friday 21st June Friday 28th June Friday 5th July Friday 12th July Friday 19th July Friday 26th July Friday 2nd August

 

I launched my call for submissions to The Emma Press Anthology of Mildly Erotic Verse in February and have since had the pleasure of being introduced to people at parties as an ‘erotic publisher.’ After two years of seeing faces drop or go blank in response to ‘ebook production controller,’ this comes as quite a relief, and the work that goes with it isn’t bad either. I’m never stuck for something scandalous to read on the train, and the acronym ‘NSFW’ has lost all meaning for me.

But setting oneself up as an erotic publisher is not without its pitfalls. . .

[Read the full article on the Erotic Review website]

When I first came across Aunt Elsie’s Secret Market, I thought it might be a cult. A sandwich board chalked with an owl and an arrow caught my eye on the way to meet a friend in Reading last year, and I weighed up the thrill of following a mysterious sign up into an office block against the embarrassment of falling for some textbook cult trickery. Would I have learned nothing from watching both the Children of Barabbas and Life Mechanics storylines on Neighbours in the 90s? Then my friend arrived and curiosity got the better of us, and boy am I glad it did. Aunt Elsie’s is AMAZING. It’s lovingly curated by Suzanne Stallard from local arts charity Jelly and full of gorgeous stalls selling everything from ceramics to vintage clothes to handmade fabric accessories to books by local presses. Ahem. . . I knew I wanted to be part of it and was  insanely excited when my application was accepted for the Spring Fling event in the marketplace at the beginning of May.

My canvas signs

I’d had one experience of having a stall at a fair before, but not on this scale. This time, I felt more confident about setting up my table and I was pretty pleased with my new signs, knocked up on some canvases from Hobbycraft the night before. I wanted to create some height on the stall without bringing my entire remaining stock of The Flower and the Plough, so I built a little wall from some of my favourite books, which I thought might come in handy if footfall was low during either of the days. 

The Flower and the Plough on sale

As it happened, I didn’t have time to pick up a book once. People kept stopping by to read the cards and leaf through the The Flower and the Plough, and often they wanted to chat about the poems or how I was finding being a new publisher. One lady read the Catullus postcard the whole way through and was astonished by how apt the line ‘Oh kiss me all the way to the tattoo parlour!’ was for her daughter, who’d married a man with a sleeve tattoo and subsequently had her own arm tattooed to match. Another lady read the Napoleon BonaCard and couldn’t believe that this ardent declaration had come from the same man she’d studied at school.

Selling as I do mostly online, it was lovely to be able to see people’s reactions to the book and my cards and brooches, including the new cards I’d made just in time for the Spring Fling and the brooches I sewed on the Friday, as a non-aggressive way to occupy myself while people were browsing my table. Since my last craft fair, I’ve refined my business plan to focus more on publishing rather than having a gift shop, but I enjoyed running the stall so much that I really would like to do it more often. To that end, I’m going to have a stall at the Lower Marsh Market (behind Waterloo) every Friday from 14th June for a month as a kind of pop-up shop, to see how it goes. I’m hoping to sell Emma Press products as well as books by other small poetry publishers and poetry-inspired affordable art by some very talented artists I know. It’s going to be AMAZING.

My favourite bookshop, the Arkadia International bookshop, is only two minutes from a church built inside a rock, on Nervanderinkatu in Helsinki. At first glance, it appears to be a small but arty, cleanly-designed book boutique, with neat shelves and several tables and sofas dotted about. Half bookshop, half gallery, perhaps.

Step inside, however, and you will learn otherwise. I stumbled upon Arkadia last month with a friend, having intended to visit it at some point but not having looked it up on a map. We wandered in hesitantly and were welcomed by Ian Bourgeot, one of the proprietors, who suggested we might want to take a tour of the shop, all bajillion rooms of it. For it turns out Arkadia is not a one-room book boutique but in fact a veritable empire, stretching out far underground in a network of rooms all filled with secondhand books and gizmos. A man on a sofa recommended we take a butter eye bun and leave a trail of crumbs in case we got lost.

So we went down the stairs and discovered a wonderland. It was as if someone (ok, Ian and his wife Liisa) had asked themselves, ‘What are all the best things in the world?’ and come up with books, company, space, music, nice surprises and good lighting. There was a sense of neatness and everything having its place, but also enough intriguingly-labelled cardboard boxes and cubbyholes to make it feel like we were discovering it all for the first time. The first room contained a billiards table and a children’s section, a globe and several bookworms deep in study; the next was lined with boxes of blockbusting authors; from the third poured a lugubrious old English man’s voice, which turned out to be an audiobook; the fourth was a light and charming meeting room; and the fifth was a chapel. For quiet contemplation and the drinking of wine.

If I were pressed to describe the Platonic ideal of bookshops, I’d come up with pretty much an exact description of Arkadia. This aptly-named establishment isn’t just a bookshop; it’s an M&S, Carlsberg-made, glacially-proportioned utopia, where people can go to browse, hang out and study, all in beautiful surroundings and hosted by the delightful Ian and Liisa. They hold events nearly every evening, ranging from lectures on international politics to poetry and jazz, and if I lived in Helsinki I know I would be there all the time. Do yourself a favour and swing by if you’re in Helsinki, or maybe go to Helsinki just to visit Arkadia. I promise it will be the highlight of your trip (assuming you love books and/or people).

http://www.arkadiabookshop.fi/