Posts Tagged ‘mildly erotic verse’

The Emma Press is releasing an expanded edition of The Emma Press Anthology of Mildly Erotic Verse (2013) in time for Valentine’s Day.

→ Read more

In a move set to rattle the producers of Fifty Shades of Grey, due for cinematic release on 13th February, the Emma Press has announced a new call for ‘mildly erotic’ poems.

The publisher is planning an expanded second edition of The Emma Press Anthology of Mildly Erotic Verse (2013), featuring more poems about ‘love, sex and romance, focusing particularly on the headspace of eroticism’.

Publisher Emma Wright said: ‘I appreciate that our announcement will overshadow the release of the film, but I’m sure everyone will still be able to get just as excited about Jamie Dornan and Dakota Johnson as they do about the chance to send us erotic poems. My apologies to Sam Taylor-Johnson and Vintage Books nonetheless.’

Poets are invited to submit up to two poems by 15th March 2015. Mildly Erotic Verse: Darker (kidding!) is publishing in February 2016 and will be edited by Rachel Piercey (Newdigate Prize, 2008) and Emma Wright, founder of the Emma Press.

The Emma Press first published The Emma Press Anthology of Mildly Erotic Verse in September 2013. It was accompanied by the Arts Council-supported Mildly Erotic Poetry Tour and the publisher has since produced one-off mildly erotic poetry events at Ledbury Poetry Festival, the Freud Museum and at the opening weekend of the Southbank Centre’s inaugural Festival of Love.

Publisher Emma Wright says: ‘When we first put out a call for mildly erotic poetry in 2013, we were a very new press but we had some great submissions even then and we chose 23 poems which I still really love. It’s now been a year and a half since we published The Emma Press Anthology of Mildly Erotic Verse and people are still enthusing about it, so we thought we would throw it open to more poets who have discovered the Emma Press since then. The whole point of the original anthology was to showcase and celebrate the diversity of human erotic experiences, so I’d love to double the number of poems and experiences depicted in Mildly Erotic Verse: 2nd Edition.‘

‘We’ve continued to work closely with several of the poets who first came to us through our call for erotic poems, and I don’t think this is a coincidence: if I connect with someone’s erotic vision, I’m likely to connect with their literary voice too.’

The Emma Press is presenting further mildly erotic verse at the Purbeck Literary Festival on Saturday 21st February, in a reading at the Worth Matravers Tearoom featuring Jo Brandon, Richard O’Brien and Rachel Piercey (ticket information here).

Further details of the call for submissions can be found on the Submissions page.

I thought that the Anthology of Mildly Erotic Verse would be my first erotic publication, but quite a few people have observed that the title of The Flower and the Plough is pretty erotic too, along with some of the poems within. Embarrassingly, this hadn’t occurred to me at all, but since working on the Erotic Anthology I’ve become a lot more alert to potential erotic content and if anything I’ve gone too far the other way, seeing eroticism in everything.

So far, the best submissions for the anthology have done exactly what I asked for in my brief and surprised me, both with their treatment of all matters erotic and in their interpretation of what can be erotic in the first place. It’s not that I equate eroticism with novelty, but it’s hard to be excited when you know exactly how that flower metaphor is going to unfold. None of that in The Anthology of Mildly Erotic Verse, which is shaping up to be an utter delight. I can’t wait to start sharing it with everyone in September, but until then here are four things I didn’t expect to be erotic, either to me or other people. Then roll on September, when you’ll never look at wolves or peanut butter or cassette tapes in the same way again.

 

7 Minutes In Heaven with Mike O’Brien, guest starring Patricia Clarkson

All of Mike O’Brien’s videos in this series are gold, so funny and charming and always surprising. O’Brien takes the central premise of the American high-school sleepover game and expands the scope of what one can get up to within a cupboard (mini dramas, hard-hitting interviews, musical breaks) while clinging doggedly to the original and best occupation. He gets the best out of all his guests, whether they’re comedians or just celebrities, and the humour is never uncomfortable or cruel. I love the ones with Seth Meyers, Amy Poehler and Kristen Wiig, but for sheer and incredible eroticism you have to watch the Patricia Clarkson episode. It is sexy and hilarious. ‘Are you really gonna kiss me?’

The photo of John Steinbeck on the Kindle screensaver.

Obviously the worst author portrait in the Kindle screensaver series is Emily Dickinson. No-one wants to pick up their Kindle and see her massive black eyes staring out at them. When I worked in ebook production and carried a Kindle around with me, the usual reaction to Emily Dickinson was to shudder and flip the switch, except for one time when I was told by a co-worker instead to ‘stick it on that saucy little picture of John Steinbeck.’ Sorry, what?

Gene Kelly in a bodysuit in An American In Paris

 

 

 

 

 

Gene Kelly didn’t immediately strike me as an attractive man when I first watched his films as a teenager. He was sturdy and safe, jolly and enterprising, which somehow didn’t add up to hotness when I was fifteen. However, there was this disturbing bit in An American In Paris where Kelly recreates a Toulouse Lautrec drawing and does a waggly kind of dance which irresistibly recalls Ned Flanders in a ski suit.

Tegan’s eyebrows in the music video for Closer

Eroticism is all in the tiny details.