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Urban Myths and LegendsEdited by Rachel Piercey and Emma Wright

Illustrated by Emma Wright

Paperback ISBN 978-1-910139-24-0
Publication date: 2nd June 2016
72 pages / 33 poems / 9 illustrations

Price: £10 (paperback)/£5.50 (ebook)

Buy now

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Urban Myths and Legends is a lively collection of poems by modern poets who have taken inspiration from the Roman poet Ovid’s Metamorphoses. The poems all tell stories which include a transformation – some inspired directly by the Metamorphoses and some completely new and of our time. Wings sprout, leaves fall and no state is certain, as the poets channel Ovid’s mischief and whisper tales of just and unjust deserts.

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Reviews

‘Inspired by Ovid’s Metamorphoses, each poem in this small wonder of a book considers transformations in their many forms. Whether we’re witnessing a reversal, acceleration or an entirely new metamorphosis, each poem in this eye-opening, thought provoking collection does just that – provokes thought. […] Accompanied by well thought images some of which make use of the recurring motif of trees – a symbol of transformation – and featuring poems which play with structural and topical constructs, this is certainly a collection to spend time with and one which will stay with you for a long time.’ – LiteratureWorks

‘This breath-taking book offers every lover of poetry – and those who do not know much about the lure of the poem – a surreptitious look into the world of myths and legends. Every poem has something to offer even the most cynical of readers. […] In this anthology every poem earns its place. Each one is strong in terms of content, style and technique to pull off those surprises. It’s unusual in an anthology not to find one slightly weaker poem than the rest but that doesn’t happen here. The editors have worked hard to keep the pace and structure of the book highly suggestive and intriguing.’ – Wendy French, London Grip

Urban Myths and Legends feels like a city walk along a street with varied architecture, some buildings ornately constructed, some classical and modern with clean lines, each a marriage of form and function; each worth stopping to study while a gentle wind whispers of history, suggestive fantasy and magic realism along a street worth return visits.’ – Emma Lee’s Blog

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About the editors

Rachel and Emma

Rachel Piercey is a poet and editor who also writes for children. Her poems have appeared in magazines including Magma, The Rialto, Poems In Which, Butcher’s Dog and The Poetry Review and she has two pamphlets with the Emma Press, The Flower and the Plough and Rivers Wanted.

Emma Wright studied Classics at Brasenose College, Oxford. She worked in ebook production at Orion Publishing Group before leaving to set up the Emma Press in 2012. In 2015 she toured the UK with the Myths and Monsters poetry tour for children, supported with funding from Arts Council England as part of the Lottery-funded Grants for the Arts programme. She lives in Birmingham.

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About the poets

Deborah Alma has an MA in Creative Writing, teaches at Worcester University and works with people with dementia and at the end of their lives using poetry. She is Emergency Poet in her 1970s ambulance and edited Emergency Poet: An Anti-Stress Anthology. Her debut pamphlet is True Tales of the Countryside (Emma Press, 2015).

Sophie F Baker has had work published in magazines including Smiths Knoll, The Rialto, Poetry London and Magma. She has an Andrew Waterhouse Award from New Writing North, and an Eric Gregory Award. She works at The Poetry Society and is a founding editor of poetry magazine Butcher’s Dog. www.sophiefbaker.co.uk

Sohini Basak lives and works in Delhi. She was one of the recipients of the inaugural RædLeaf India Poetry Prize and was shortlisted for the 2014 Melita Hume Poetry Prize. She is a recent graduate of the University of East Anglia, where she was awarded the Malcolm Bradbury Continuation Grant for Poetry.

Dzifa Benson was born in London to Ghanaian parents and grew up in West Africa. She writes, performs, curates and teaches, and has performed her work at venues including Tate Britain, the Institute of Contemporary Arts and Southbank Centre. She was a writer-in-residence at the Courtauld Institute of Art in 2007-8.

Nisha Bhakoo is a writer based in Berlin. Her poetry has appeared in 3:AM Magazine, Haverthorn, Mud Press’s Christmas Zine, Poems In Which and Ink Sweat and Tears. In 2015, she was shortlisted for the Jane Martin Poetry Prize, won third prize in the Ledbury Festival competition and was selected for the GlogauAIR artist residency scheme.

Rohan Chhetri is a Nepali-Indian poet. His poems have been published in Eclectica, Rattle, EVENT and The Antigonish Review, among others, and is forthcoming in Prelude and Fulcrum. He has won The (Great) Indian Poetry Collective’s ‘Emerging Poets Prize 2015’, and his first book of poems, Slow Startle, will be published in July 2016.

Ellie Danak is an Edinburgh-based poet with a background in researching Swedish crime novels. Her poems have been published in a number of anthologies and magazines, including the Emma Press, Magma, Antiphon and others. She is on the Scottish Book Trust’s New Writers Awards 2016 shortlist.

Francine Elena was born in Canterbury and grew up in London, Portugal and Scotland. Her poems were shortlisted for the 2014 PigHog Prize and have appeared in various publications including The Best British Poetry 2013 and 2015 anthologies, the Sunday Times, Poetry London, Poetry Wales, The Quietus, Ambit, 3:AM Magazine and Wasafiri.

Ella Frears has had poetry published in Lighthouse, Poems In Which, The Stockholm Review of Literature and The Moth, among others. She is a trustee of Magma and is co-editing issue 66. She was shortlisted for Young Poet Laureate for London (2014) and was Poet in Residence at Knole House (2015). Ella is currently a Jerwood/Arvon Mentee (2016/17).

Linda Goulden alternates between urban and rural settings and her poems between magazine (incl. Magma), anthology (incl. Beautiful Dragons), digital (incl. Fair Acre) and readings (incl. Sheffield Poem-a-thon). Her poem in this book was first published by Manchester Cathedral, where you will find a wood carving of the Eagle and Child.

John Greening is a winner of the Bridport and TLS Prizes and a Cholmondeley Award and an RLF Writing Fellow at Newnham College, Cambridge. His recent books include To the War Poets (Carcanet), the music anthology Accompanied Voices, and Heath (with Penelope Shuttle) from Nine Arches Press. See www.johngreening.co.uk

Although they recently had to neuter Ralph, their dog, after he got into one too many fights, Jack Houston and his partner have had a baby so don’t feel so bad about it. His recent work can be found online at London Grip, The London Journal of Fiction and New Boots & Pantisocracies.

Annie Katchinska was born in Moscow in 1990 and grew up in London. Her Faber New Poets pamphlet was published in 2010, and her poems have been published in various journals and anthologies. After graduating from Cambridge University she spent two years living in Sapporo, Japan, before returning to London in 2013.

Anna Kisby is a Devon-based poet widely published in magazines and anthologies, including Magma, Mslexia, Poetry News, the British Library’s Alice anthology and Live Canon’s Project 154: contemporary poets respond to Shakespeare’s sonnets. She was commended in the Faber New Poets Scheme 2016.

Joe Lines studied English at the University of Sussex and Queen’s University Belfast. His poems have appeared in Causeway/Cabhsair, The Cadaverine magazine and The Lifeboat.

Emma McKervey studied at Dartington College of Arts and lives in Northern Ireland. She has worked in community arts and education over the years and has had numerous poems published in journals and anthologies.

Margot Myers lives in Oxford. She loves using myth and fairytale in her poetry. She has been placed or commended in The Havant Poetry Competition 2013, 2014 and 2015, the Cinnamon Press mini-competition Feb 2016, and shortlisted for The Bridport Flashfiction Prize 2015. She has a poem in The Emma Press Anthology of Dance (2015).

Richard O’Brien’s pamphlets include The Emmores (Emma Press, 2014) and A Bloody Mess (Valley Press, 2015). His work has featured in Oxford Poetry, Poetry London, and The Salt Book of Younger Poets. He is working on a Midlands3Cities-funded PhD on Shakespeare and verse drama at the University of Birmingham.

Kathy Pimlott’s poems have been published in magazines including Magma, Brittle Star and The North, online and in anthologies, most recently the Emma Press’s Best Friends Forever. In 2015, she was one of the Poetry Trust’s Aldeburgh Eight. Her pamphlet Goose Fair Night was published in March 2016 by the Emma Press.

Susan Richardson is a Welsh poet, performer and educator. Her third poetry collection, skindancing (Cinnamon Press, 2015), is themed around human-animal metamorphosis and our intimacy with, and alienation from, the wild and our animal selves. She is currently poet-in-residence with both the Marine Conservation Society and World Animal Day.

Jennifer Robertson is a poet and critic living in Bombay. Her book reviews and essays have appeared in Scroll, American Book Review and the Telegraph. She co-curates the ‘Literary Encounters’ session for The PEN-All India Centre. Her first poetry manuscript was chosen for the Editor’s choice award by The (Great) Indian Poetry Collective.

Jacqueline Saphra’s The Kitchen of Lovely Contraptions (flipped eye) was nominated for the Aldeburgh First Collection Prize. If I Lay on my Back I Saw Nothing but Naked Women (Emma Press) won Best Collaborative Work at the Saboteur Awards 2015. Her second collection, All My Mad Mothers, is due from Nine Arches Press in Spring 2017.

Paul Stephenson was a winner in the Poetry Business Book & Pamphlet Competition, judged by Billy Collins. His pamphlet Those People (Smith/Doorstop) was published in 2015. He has been published in magazines including The Rialto, The North and Magma. He took part in the Jerwood/Arvon mentoring scheme. He currently lives in Paris.

Degna Stone is a poet and producer based in Tyne and Wear. She is co-founder of Butcher’s Dog poetry magazine and in 2015 she received a Northern Writers Award. She was recently selected for The Complete Works III, a national development programme for advanced Black and Asian poets.

Jon Stone is a commissioning editor at Sidekick Books and a PhD researcher in poetry-game hybrids. His collection School of Forgery (Salt, 2012) was a PBS Recommendation and he won the Poetry London competition in 2014. His latest pamphlet is Tomboys (Tungsten Press, 2016), a set of calligrams based on inspiring girl characters from anime.

Pam Thompson is a poet and university lecturer based in Leicester. She is one of the organisers of Word!, a spoken-word night at The Y Theatre and her publications include The Japan Quiz (Redbeck Press, 2009) and Show Date and Time (Smith/Doorstop, 2006). She won First Prize (Judges’ Prize) in the Magma Poetry Competition in 2015.

Ruth Wiggins lives in London. Her work has appeared in magazines and anthologies, and her first pamphlet Myrtle was published by the Emma Press in 2014. She blogs about poetry, travel and mud at mudpath.wordpress.com

Lana Faith Young lives in Australia. In 2012 Lana was shortlisted for the Western Australian Premiere’s Book Awards in the digital narrative category. Lana has recently completed a Bachelor of Communications degree through Griffiths University. Lana is currently writing her second novel for children.

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Edited by Rachel Piercey and Emma Wright

Illustrated by Emma Wright

Paperback ISBN 978-1-910139-34-9
Publication date: 29th January 2016
104 pages / 50 poems / 8 illustrations

Price: £10 (paperback)/£5.50 (ebook)

Buy now

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Aren’t mildly erotic things the most erotic of all? Sometimes eroticism isn’t just about sex – it can be about anticipation, desire, intimacy and romance. It can be wild, hilarious, beautiful and alarming, and it may be hard to define but you’ll know it when you see it. Mildly Erotic Verse skips the mechanics and dives straight into the emotional core of sex, celebrating the diversity and eccentricity of human sexuality.

This is the expanded second edition of The Emma Press Anthology of Mildly Erotic Verse (2013). It features 17 of the original poems and 33 brand-new poems.

  • Read editor Emma Wright’s article ‘How to be erotic’ over on the Inpress blog

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Reviews

‘In the expanded edition of Mildly Erotic Verse, it’s immediately obvious that this love poetry is as far as possible from the wistful odes and idealised damsels of the traditional lustful troubadour. In particular, women are not merely the object of a male poet’s sighing ardour; their voices come through louder than ever, articulating powerful and complex romantic experiences.’– Charlotte Runcie, the Daily Telegraph

Mildly Erotic Verse shows that humour and sensuality are not mutually exclusive. It brings to light the manifold ways sexuality can be experienced and expressed, whether with a partner or alone, real or imagined. The collection opens up discussions which it purposefully seems not to conclude. […] Like all good erotica should, Mildly Erotic Verse knows what is best left unsaid and leaves you longing for more.’ – Emma-Lee Davidson, Emma-Lee on Poetry

‘Mildly Erotic Verse reflects romance and relationships in the 21st Century. Some of the poems are experimental and play with form, and the idea of loving someone imagined or not present. […] This collection is also excellently curated, the poems are honed, honest, refreshing, and even dark. I would say it is a must-read.’ Durre Shahwar

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About the editors

Rachel and EmmaRachel Piercey (pictured, left) is a former editor at The Cadaverine magazine and a current editor at the Emma Press. She studied English Literature at St Hugh’s College, Oxford, where she won the Newdigate Prize in 2008. Her illustrated pamphlet of love poems, The Flower and the Plough, was published by the Emma Press in 2013 and her second pamphlet, Rivers Wanted, in 2014.

Emma Wright (pictured, right) studied Classics at Brasenose College, Oxford. She worked in ebook production at Orion Publishing Group before leaving to set up the Emma Press in 2012. In 2015 she toured the UK with the Myths and Monsters poetry tour for children, supported with funding from Arts Council England as part of the Lottery-funded Grants for the Arts programme. She lives in Birmingham.

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About the poets

Jamie Baxter grew up in Solihull and works in London, having graduated from Durham University where he studied Engineering. He has had poems published by The Next Review, Astronaut zine, The Cadaverine magazine and Silkworms Ink. He has also attended a Tower Poetry School.

Vasiliki Albedo Bennu was born in Greece and lived in London and New York before returning to Athens recently to take advantage of the local lucrative economic opportunities. Her poems have appeared in The Interpreter’s House, Ink, Sweat and Tears, Belleville Park Pages and the US magazine Beloit Poetry Journal.

Nisha Bhakoo is a writer and video artist. Her poetry has appeared in Poems in Which, Ink, Sweat and Tears, The Cadaverine and Morphrog. In 2015, she was shortlisted for the Jane Martin Poetry Prize, won third prize in the Ledbury Festival competition and was selected for the GlogauAIR artist residency scheme in Berlin.

Julia Bird grew up in Gloucestershire and now lives in London. She works part-time for the Poetry School, and produces touring live literature shows as a freelancer. Her first collection Hannah and the Monk was published by Salt in 2008, and her second, Twenty-Four Seven Blossom, in 2013.

Sophia Blackwell was born in Newcastle in 1982. Her poetry has been anthologised by Bloodaxe, Nine Arches and Sidekick Books. She is the author of one poetry collection, Into Temptation (2009), and a novel, After My Own Heart (2012). Her second collection is due out in 2016 with Burning Eye Books.

Jo Brandon has a degree in Creative Writing from the University of Leeds and is former General Editor of The Cadaverine. Jo’s pamphlet, Phobia, was published in 2012 and her collection The Learned Goose in 2015, both by Valley Press. She can be found online at www.jobrandon.com

Annie Brechin has been published in The Wolf, Stand, Magma, Rising, B O D Y, Paris Lit Up and others. In 2003 she was awarded a Jerwood/Arvon Young Poets Apprenticeship. She is a former Poetry Editor for The Prague Revue and moved from Paris to Dubai last year.

Alan Buckley’s debut pamphlet Shiver (tall-lighthouse, 2009) was a Poetry Book Society Choice. His second pamphlet, The Long Haul, will be published by HappenStance in 2016. He works in Oxford as a psychotherapist, and as a school writer-in-residence for the charity First Story.

In a previous life, Helen Clare was a science teacher. She now works on projects which combine science, poetry and learning, including a poetry residency at the Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester. Her published work includes Mollusc (Comma, 2004) and Entomology (HappenStance, 2014).

George David Clark‘s Reveille won the Miller Williams Prize and his new work can be found or is forthcoming in AGNI, The Believer, Blackbird, The Cincinnati Review, FIELD, Measure and elsewhere. He edits the journal 32 Poems and lives with his wife and their three young children in Washington, Pennsylvania.

Mel Denham lives in the literature-loving city of Melbourne. She’s had a lifelong love affair with poetry but has only recently begun writing it. She is working on a collection of poems about her other love, the postal system. Brief musings on this and other ephemera can be found at meldenham.com

Isobel Dixon is the author of Weather Eye, A Fold in the Map and The Tempest Prognosticator and co-wrote and performed in The Debris Field. In 2016 Mariscat will publish a pamphlet, The Leonids, and Nine Arches will publish her new collection, Bearings.

Hugh Dunkerley grew up in Edinburgh and Bath and now lives in mildly erotic Brighton with his wife and young son. He has published one full collection, Hare (Cinnamon Press, 2010), in which sex and nature feature prominently. He is currently working on a new collection about fatherhood.

Victoria Gatehouse lives in Yorkshire. Her poems have appeared in magazines and anthologies including Mslexia, Magma, The Rialto, The Interpreter’s House, Prole and Furies. Her competition wins and placements include Ilkley and Mslexia, and she is currently working on a first collection.

Mary Gilonne is a translator from Devon, who has lived in France for many years. She has won the 2015 Wenlock Prize and been shortlisted for the Bridport Prize (2010, 2011, 2015) and commended for the Teignmouth and Caterpillar Prizes (2015). She is working hopefully towards her first collection.

Stephanie Green has an MPhil in Creative Writing from Glasgow University. Her latest pamphlet is Flout (HappenStance, 2015). She is a Creative Writing tutor and also reviews Theatre and Dance. Originally London-based, she moved, via Wales, to Edinburgh in 2000. See http://sites.google.com/site/stephgreen1/home

Robert Hamberger was first prizewinner in Chroma’s International Queer Writing Competition in 2006. His full-length collections include The Smug Bridegroom (Five Leaves, 2002) and Torso (Redbeck, 2007). His fourth collection, Blue Wallpaper, is forthcoming from Waterloo Press. He lives in Brighton.

Ramona Herdman is working on a pamphlet for publication by HappenStance in 2017. She was one of the Poetry Trust’s Aldeburgh Eight in 2011. Lately, she is writing mostly about alcohol. She tweets occasionally @ramonaherdman

Hilaire has published short stories and poetry in British and Australian magazines and several anthologies. Triptych Poets 1 (Blemish Books, 2010) featured a selection of her poems. She is working on a poetry collection with Joolz Sparkes, London Undercurrents, unearthing women’s voices north and south of the river.

Lynn Hoffman is a cook and a poet. He describes himself as a beer evangelist, spreading the good word of the good taste. He is author of The Bachelor’s Cat, bang-BANG, Radiation Days, The New Short Course in Wine, Short Course in Beer and Short Course in Rum.

James Horrocks is a writer and musician living in Bolton and born in Salford. He recently completed a Masters in Creative Writing at the University of Manchester, specialising in poetry. His poems have been published in The Manchester Anthology 2014 and NowThen magazine.

Kirsten Irving co-runs Sidekick Books with Jon Stone and her own poetry has been published by HappenStance and Salt. She normally writes a lot about robots. And schoolgirls too. And sometimes cannibals. Sexy robot schoolgirl cannibals.

Victoria Kennefick’s debut poetry pamphlet, White Whale (Southword Editions, 2015), won the Munster Literature Centre Fool for Poetry Chapbook Competition 2014 and the Saboteur Award for Best Poetry Pamphlet in 2015. Follow her @VKennefick

Amy Key was born in Dover and grew up in Kent and the North East. She now lives and works in London. She co-edits the online journal Poems in Which. Her pamphlet Instead of Stars was published by tall-lighthouse in 2009. Her debut collection Luxe was published by Salt in 2013.

Lancashire-born Angela Kirby lives in London but has spent time in France, Spain and America. She is the author of five books on food and gardening and her poems have been published widely. Her fourth poetry collection, The Days After Always: New and Selected Poems, was published by Shoestring Press in 2015.

Anja Konig grew up in the German language and now writes in English. Her first pamphlet, Advice for an Only Child, was shortlisted for the Michael Marks Poetry Award in 2015. Its advantages are: 1) it is very cheap, 2) it is very short.

Ali Lewis has work forthcoming in Brittle Star and Asterism. He organises the arts night Theme and was runner-up in the Poetry Book Fair competition. He is currently collaborating with the contemporary classical music group The Hermes Experiment, and is studying for an MA in Creative Writing at Goldsmiths.

Holly Magill is a poet from Worcestershire. She has a BA in Creative Writing from University Of Birmingham and has had poems in various publications, including Nutshells and Nuggets, The Stare’s Nest and Three Drops & A Cauldron. She is fond of cats and strong tea above most things.

Ikhda Ayuning Maharsi has worked in television, advertising and as a scriptwriter on a sitcom in Indonesia. She performed her poetry for the first time in 2011, at Cité Internationale Universitaire de Paris. Her debut pamphlet, Ikhda, by Ikhda, was published by the Emma Press in 2014. She lives in Tréguier, France.

Amy McCauley’s poetry has been published widely in anthologies and magazines, including The Poetry of Sex (Penguin, 2014), Hallelujah for 50ft Women (Bloodaxe, 2015) and Best British Poetry 2015 (Salt). She is a PhD candidate at Aberyswtyth University and Poetry Editor for New Welsh Review.

Laura McKee’s poems have appeared in journals including Other Poetry, Obsessed With Pipework and The Journal. In 2015 she was nominated for Best Single Poem at the Forward Prizes, was a winner in the Guernsey International Poetry Competition, and was shortlisted for the Bridport Prize.

Fiona Moore lives in Greenwich. Her second pamphlet, Night Letter, was published by HappenStance in September 2015. She is assistant editor at The Rialto and blogs at Displacement.

Steve Nash is a writer, lecturer and terrible musician based in Yorkshire. He was named the 2014 Saboteur Spoken Word Performer of the Year and his first collection, Taking the Long Way Home, is available now from Stairwell Books.

Richard O’Brien’s poems have featured in Oxford Poetry and The Best British Poetry 2013, and in 2015 he won the sonnet category of the London Book Fair Poetry Prize. His pamphlets include The Emmores (Emma Press, 2014) and A Bloody Mess (Valley Press, 2015). He is working on a PhD in contemporary verse drama.

Camille Ralphs started in Stoke, and has studied in Lancaster, Cambridge and now Oxford. She is a senior poetry editor at The Missing Slate, and was 2014’s Cambridge editor-in-chief of The Mays Anthology. Her debut pamphlet, Malkin, was published by the Emma Press in 2015.

After graduating from Oxford in 2012, Emma Reay was a little lost. She tried a few different things but soon decided to give adult life the slip and hitchhike around America, where she may still be.

Kristen Roberts is a poet from Melbourne. Her poems have won several awards and have been published in Award Winning Australian Writing, Quadrant, Australian Love Poems 2013 and page seventeen. Her first pamphlet, The Held and the Lost, was published in 2014 with the Emma Press.

Jacqueline Saphra’s The Kitchen of Lovely Contraptions (flipped eye, 2011) was nominated for the Aldeburgh First Collection Prize. An illustrated book of prose poems, If I Lay on my Back I Saw Nothing but Naked Women, was published by the Emma Press in 2014 and won the Saboteur Award for Best Collaborative Work.

Lawrence Schimel was born in New York and has lived in Madrid, Spain, for over 17 years. He is the author of two poetry pamphlets in English – Fairy Tales for Writers and Deleted Names – and a full collection in Spanish, Desayuno en la cama, as well as a collection of erotic short stories, His Tongue.

Stephen Sexton lives in Belfast, where he is studying at the Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry. His poems have appeared in Poetry Ireland, Poetry London and Best British Poetry 2015. His pamphlet, Oils (Emma Press, 2014), was the 2015 PBS Winter Pamphlet Choice.

Natalie Shaw lives and works in London. Her work has appeared in various print and online journals and anthologies, most recently And Other Poems and Paper Swan’s Schooldays.

Di Slaney is a smallholder, marketing consultant and publisher from Nottinghamshire. She co-owns Candlestick Press, and her poems have been widely published. She won first prize in the 2014 Brittle Star and 2015 Four Corners poetry competitions. Her first full collection, Reward for Winter, is available from Valley Press.

Ruth Stacey is a writer, artist, librarian and tutor. Her debut collection, Queen, Jewel, Mistress, was published by Eyewear in 2015. Her pamphlet, Fox Boy, was published by Dancing Girl Press in 2014. She designs the covers for V. Press poetry pamphlets and lives in Worcestershire.

Jon Stone was born in Derby and is currently London-based. His collection, School of Forgery, was a Poetry Book Society Recommendation and he won an Eric Gregory Award in 2012. He’s also co-creator of Sidekick Books, publishers of collaborative creative anthologies.

Kelley Swain is a writer and editor based in London. She is the author of several books of poetry, a novel, and a forthcoming memoir – The Naked Muse (Valley Press) – as well as a contributor to The Lancet. Kelley is a member of the Nevada Street Poets.

Ali Thurm was born in Tynemouth and brought up in the north of England. She now lives in London with her three children. She teaches, writes poetry and short stories, and is working on a novel, The Quiet Water Spy.

Sara-Mae Tuson is a freelance editor and copywriter. She has had short fiction, poetry and articles published in a wide range of publications, including the Salt anthology Overheard, Scouting magazine, Ink, Sweat and Tears, Obsessed with Pipework, 433, Trespass, The London Magazine, Inky Needles, Rising and more.

Nicola Warwick was born in Kent and now lives in Suffolk, where she works in local government. Her first collection, Groundings, was published by Cinnamon Press in 2014.

Ruth Wiggins lives in London. Her work has appeared in UK magazines and anthologies, and has been commended in recent competitions. Her first pamphlet, Myrtle, was published in 2014 by the Emma Press. Her photography book, Wonder Women of America, was published in 2008. She blogs at Mudpath.

Jerrold Yam (b. 1991) is the Singaporean author of three poetry collections: Intruder (2014), Scattered Vertebrae (2013) and Chasing Curtained Suns (2012). He has received awards from the British Council, National University of Singapore and Poetry Book Society, and been nominated for the Forward and Pushcart Prizes.

The Emma Press has launched an anthology of poems about slow things, edited by Rachel Piercey and Emma Wright. The aptly-named Slow Things contains poems about everything from slow creatures (sloths), slow processes (cleaning teapots) and slow treats (parkin).

→ Read more

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Slow ThingsEdited by Rachel Piercey and Emma Wright

Illustrated by Emma Wright

Paperback ISBN 978-1-910139-16-5
Publication date: 14th May 2015
64 pages, 31 poems, 7 illustrations
Price: £10 (paperback)/£5.50 (ebook)

Buy now

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‘Touch that water, taste calm, hear the clear
and pleasant stranger lapping at your sight,
stroke fronded stones. Breathe out. Stay here.’

– from ‘That water’, by Di Slaney

What’s so good about being fast? Sometimes a little patience goes a long way, and a slow thing can be just what you need. Slow walks, slow thoughts and slow afternoons in the sun provide inspiration for the poets in Slow Things, an anthology which celebrates taking life at a leisurely pace and existing in the present. As ice, traffic and a giant wooden boulder all advance with a soothing inevitability, the poets invite us to see the beauty in the accretion of tea-stains in a teapot and the unwavering stare of a loris.

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Reviews

‘The Emma Press’ bitesized anthology is as appealing as any well-pitched children’s book; the cover’s enticing maroon and Quentin Blake-esque sloth illustration suggests another, less complicated world of the sort in which I would like to dwell. […] By poem one, I felt calm. By poem ten, I was blissed out. In foregrounding poems’ essential luxury – yes, they can (and should) be moving, provocative, startling; but they are also a past-time – the editors have made of this little book an invitation to cosiness.’ — Penny Boxall for Sabotage Reviews

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About the editors

Rachel Piercey is a former editor at The Cadaverine magazine and a current editor at the Emma Press. She studied English Literature at St Hugh’s College, Oxford, where she won the Newdigate Prize in 2008. Her illustrated pamphlet of love poems, The Flower and the Plough, was published by the Emma Press in 2013 and her second pamphlet, Rivers Wanted, in 2014.

Emma Wright studied Classics at Brasenose College, Oxford. She worked in ebook production at Orion Publishing Group before leaving to set up the Emma Press in 2012. In 2013 she toured the UK with The Mildly Erotic Poetry Tour, supported with funding from Arts Council England as part of the Lottery-funded Grants for the arts programme.

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About the poets

Juana Adcock is a poet and translator. Her work has appeared in Magma, New Writing Scotland, Gutter, Asymptote and Words Without Borders. Her first book, Manca, was selected by distinguished critic Sergio González Rodríguez as one of the best poetry books published in 2014.

Elizabeth Barrett has received several awards for her poetry, including an Arts Council England Writers’ Award in 2000. ‘May’ is from a series of sonnets written following the death of her mother and published in her fourth collection, A Dart of Green and Blue (Arc Publications, 2010). 

Alison Brackenbury was born in 1953. Her eighth collection is Then (Carcanet, 2013). A new collection is due from Carcanet in Spring 2016. She has won an Eric Gregory Award (1982) and a Cholmondeley Award (1997), and has broadcast recently on Radio 3 and 4. She lives in Gloucestershire and is, often, spectacularly slow.

Cameron Brady-Turner’s poems can be found in the 2012-13 and 2013-14 Barbican Young Poets’ anthologies and in Kumquat Poetry. He is a member of the Burn After Reading poetry collective and is currently studying for an MA in English at UCL.

Charlotte Buckley’s poems have appeared in Icarus Magazine, The New Writer, Stinging Fly and The Cadaverine Magazine (for which she is a regular poetry reviewer). She came third in the 2013 Basil Bunting Poetry Award, was highly commended in the 2014 Gregory O’Donoghue Poetry Prize, and came second in the 2015 Jane Martin Poetry Prize.

Kay Buckley lives in Barnsley. She was overall winner of the 2014 York Mix poetry competition and her poems have been published in magazines including Antiphon, Butcher’s Dog, Brittle Star and Proletarian Poetry. She loves having Sunday as a slow day – reading while drinking a hot pot of tea.

George David Clark is the author of Reveille, winner of the 2015 Miller Williams Prize from the University of Arkansas Press. He is the editor of 32 Poems and lives in Indiana with his wife and their three young children.

Geraldine Clarkson lives in Warwickshire. Her poems have appeared in The Best British Poetry (Salt, 2014), Furies (For Books’ Sake, 2014), and The Poetry Review. She was the Selected Poet in Magma 58 and won the 2015 Magma Editors’ Prize. She is working on her first collection. You can read some of her poems here.

Catherine Temma Davidson is a writer and teacher who grew up in LA and now lives in London with her husband and two children. She has published one novel about myths and Greek women, called The Priest Fainted, and two poetry pamphlets: Inheriting the Ocean and Behind the Lines.

Alexandra Davis lives in Suffolk with her husband and four sons. She teaches English and her poems have been published in Agenda magazine and commended in the 2014 Second Light and 2015 Torriano competitions. Her poetry draws on her roles as wife, mother and teacher. She is also a Zumba instructor. 

Isobel Dixon is the author of Weather Eye, A Fold in the Map and The Tempest Prognosticator and co-wrote and performed in The Debris Field. In 2016 Mariscat will publish a pamphlet, The Leonids, and Nine Arches will publish her new collection, Bearings.

Suzanna Fitzpatrick has been widely published in magazines and anthologies, including Furies (For Books’ Sake, 2014) and Birdbook III (Sidekick Books, 2015). She won second prize in the 2010 Buxton Competition, and won the 2014 Hamish Canham Prize. Her pamphlet, Fledglings, will be published by Red Squirrel Press in 2016. 

Caroline Gill won the inaugural Zoological Society of London Poetry Competition in 2014. She had a poem nominated for the 2014 Pushcart Prize and her chapbook, The Holy Place (co-authored with John Dotson), was published in 2012 by the Seventh Quarry Press in conjunction with Cross-Cultural Communications (New York).

Linda Goulden lives beside the Peak Forest Canal. Her poems have appeared in: publications such as Magma; competitions including Nottingham Open Poetry (1st, 2013), Poets and Players (3rd, 2013) and Happenstance (Double Dactyl, 2015); the repertoire of a local choir; the woods at Grinlow; and the RSPB’s Dovestone reservoir. You can see Linda performing a poem here.

Charlotte Higgins was born in Belfast and now lives in Cambridge. A previous winner of the Foyle Young Poet of the Year Award (2010, commended), and SLAMbassadors (2011), she has performed at the Royal Festival Hall, the Proms, Latitude, and the Nuyorican Poetry Café. She runs Speakeasy, a poetry night in Cambridge.

Paul Howarth was born in Chester and now lives in Suffolk with his wife and two boys. He works promoting reading through libraries and beyond. He contributes to various national and regional reader development projects, working with places like Writers’ Centre Norwich, the Reading Agency and the BBC.

Alex Josephy works as an NHS education adviser and lives in London and Italy. She enjoys the way the instability of travelling between countries can open up new possibilities. Her poems have been published widely in magazines and she has won awards including the 2014 McLellan Poetry Prize. Her first poetry pamphlet is publishing with Cinnamon Press in Spring 2016.

Anna Kisby is an archivist and mother of three children, and has recently moved to Devon, UK. Her poems have been placed in competitions and published in magazines and anthologies including Magma, Mslexia, Poetry News and several Emma Press anthologies. She was the winner of The New Writer 2011 poem prize.

Gill Learner’s poetry has won awards and been widely published, in places including Agenda, Her Wings of Glass (Second Light, 2014) and The Emma Press Anthology of Dance. Her collection, The Agister’s Experiment, was published by Two Rivers Press in 2011 and she hopes to have a second in 2016.

Michael Mackay was first published in the Critical Quarterly in 1969. He recently gained an MA in Creative Writing (Poetry) from Keele University and he is currently working on a book-length poem based on the ancient Songs of Ossian. He is also working towards his first poetry pamphlet.

Char March has won awards for poetry, playwrighting and short fiction. Her credits include: short story collection Something Vital Fell Through, five poetry collections including The Thousand Natural Shocks, six BBC Radio 4 plays, and seven stage plays. She ‘did’ plate tectonics in her degree, and is still in awe of it.

Sarah Miles writes poetry and flash fiction. Her poems have been published by Prole and various websites, featured on a poster at the Canterbury Wise Words Festival in 2014, and won a national writing competition. She lives in Sussex and runs Paper Swans Press.

Sara Nesbitt Gibbons has an MA in Creative Writing from Royal Holloway and her poems have been in journals and anthologies, commended in competitions and performed as theatre in St Pancras International, the Old Operating Theatre Museum and other venues. She also has an archived blog on clothes and identity.

Alun Robert was born in Scotland and has spent most of his adult life in southern England. A prolific creator of lyrical verse, he was first published in the Observer during the seventies. Recently, he featured in a Palestine anthology. His influences extend from Burns to Shakespeare, Kipling to Betjeman, Dennis to Mazzoli.

Ben Rogers lives and works in London. His poetry has been published in various magazines, including Magma, Succour, 14 and Long Poem Magazine. A selection of his poetry appears in the Carcanet anthology New Poetries VI. His first pamphlet is forthcoming with Emma Press in 2016.

Lawrence Schimel was born in New York in 1971 and has lived in Madrid since 1999. He writes in both Spanish and English and has published over one hundred books, including poetry collections Fairy Tales for Writers and Deleted Names; short story collections His Tongue and Two Boys in Love; and children’s books Little Pirate Goes to Bed and Let’s Go See Papá.

Jessica Schouela is from Montreal and is currently pursuing an MA in Art History at UCL. She is based in Edinburgh and has been published in Metatron, The Quietus and Squawk Back, amongst others. She writes a blog called Cabbage Moths Lay Their Eggs On My Kale.

Di Slaney is a smallholder, marketing consultant and publisher from Nottinghamshire. She co-owns Candlestick Press, and her poems have been widely published as well as shortlisted for the Bridport Prize. She won first prize in the 2014 Brittle Star Poetry Competition. Her pamphlet Dad’s Slideshow is available from Stonewood Press

Rob Walton is from Scunthorpe and lives on Tyneside with his family. He won first prize in the 2015 National Flash Fiction Day Micro-Fiction Competition and his poems have appeared in Butcher’s Dog, Firewords Quarterly and Northern Voices. He has written scripts and collated the New Hartley Memorial Pathway text.

Lucy Williams works in Wales as a technical author, freelance writer and Italian translator. She is co-Secretary of the Open University Writing Society and judge for the Hysteria Writing Competition. She is studying Creative Writing, contemplating an MA in Screenwriting, and has had poetry published in Hysteria3 and other journals.

Simon Williams has written poetry for 35 years. He was Bard of Exeter in 2013 and founded The Broadsheet magazine. He has five published collections, the latest being A Place Where Odd Animals Stand (Oversteps Books, 2012) and He|She (Itinerant Press, 2013). He performs regularly at events locally and further afield.

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Falling Out of the SkyEdited by Rachel Piercey and Emma Wright.

Fully illustrated by Emma Wright

Aimed at children aged 9+

Paperback ISBN 978-1-910139-18-9
Publication date: 18th June 2015
Page count: 128
Price: £8.50 (paperback)/£4.25 (ebook)

Buy now

 

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* * Shortlisted for the 2016 CLiPPA children’s poetry award * *

Falling Out Of The Sky is a treasury of poems which retell classic myths, legends and fairytales from across the world. Hansel and Gretel’s witch takes us behind the scenes of the construction of her gingerbread cottage, and Medusa explains how the snakes on her head rule out a lot of options in everyday life – wearing a hat, for example.

Full of alternate viewpoints and spirited new versions of old stories, Falling Out The Sky is a friendly introduction to poetry as well as the joy of literature. In tales about the beginning of time to the end of the world, poets and characters speak directly to the readers, reveling in the possibilities of storytelling. These are poems which parents can read aloud to younger children, and which older children can read to themselves, delighting in the mischief and invention of the poets.

In July-November 2015 we ran a tour of children’s poetry readings and workshops featuring poets from this book. Read more about the Myths and Monsters tour.

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Reviews

‘An exciting collection that challenges in a way few anthologies for children do.’ – 2016 CLiPPA judges

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About the editors

Rachel and EmmaRachel Piercey (pictured, left) is a former editor at The Cadaverine magazine and a current editor at the Emma Press. She studied English Literature at St Hugh’s College, Oxford, where she won the Newdigate Prize in 2008. Her illustrated pamphlet of love poems, The Flower and the Plough, was published by the Emma Press in 2013 and her second pamphlet, Rivers Wanted, in 2014.

Emma Wright (pictured, right) studied Classics at Brasenose College, Oxford. She worked in ebook production at Orion Publishing Group before leaving to set up the Emma Press in 2012. In 2015 she toured the UK with the Myths and Monsters poetry tour for children, supported with funding from Arts Council England as part of the Lottery-funded Grants for the Arts programme. She lives in Birmingham.

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About the poets

John Canfield grew up in Cornwall and now lives in London. His poems have appeared in various magazines and anthologies and he works for The Poetry School.

Mary Anne Clark studies English at Merton College, Oxford. She has been a prizewinner in the Poetry Society’s Foyle Young Poets of the Year Award, Cape Farewell and Timothy Corsellis competitions, and her poems have been published in magazines (including ASH) and the 2014 PBS National Student Poetry Competition anthology.

Joseph Coelho is a performance poet and playwright. His plays for young people have been commended in playwriting competitions and performed at Theatre Royal York and the Pied Piper, Polka and Unicorn theatres. His debut poetry collection, Werewolf Club Rules!, was published by Frances Lincoln Children’s Books in 2014. joseph-coelho.com

Sarah Doyle is poet-in-residence at the Pre-Raphaelite Society. Her first collection, Dreaming Spheres: Poems of the Solar System (co-written with Allen Ashley), was published by PS Publishing in 2014. Sarah co-hosts the Rhyme and Rhythm Jazz-Poetry Club at Enfield’s Dugdale Theatre. http://www.sarahdoyle.co.uk/

Matt Goodfellow is a poetry-writing primary school teacher from Manchester. His poems have been published in anthologies and magazines worldwide. www.mattgoodfellow.yolasite.com

Matt Haigh lives and works in Cardiff. His poems have appeared in Poetry London, Poetry Wales, Magma and the Guardian. He has also contributed to the Sidekick Books anthology Coin Opera II: Fulminare’s Revenge, a book of poems inspired by computer games. https://matthewhaighpoetry.wordpress.com/

John Fuller is a poet, novelist and critic. Among his recent books for grown-ups are New Selected Poems 1983-2008 (Chatto, 2012) and a collection of prose poems, The Dice Cup (Chatto, 2014). His three collections of poems for children are Squeaking Crust (Chatto, 1974), Come Aboard and Sail Away (Salamander, 1983) and You’re Having Me On! (Laurel Books, 2014). www.johnfuller-poet.com

Anna Kisby is an archivist and mother of three children, and she lives in Brighton, UK. Her poems have been placed in competitions and published in magazines and anthologies including Magma, Mslexia, Poetry News and The Emma Press Anthology of Motherhood. She was the winner of The New Writer single poem prize in 2011.

Harry Man was born in 1982. His work has appeared in The Battersea Review and Coin Opera 2: Dr Fulminare’s Revenge among other places. His first pamphlet, Lift (tall-lighthouse, 2013), won the UNESCO Bridges of Struga Award. www.manmadebooks.co.uk

Amy McCauley’s poetry has appeared widely in UK magazines and anthologies. Her current project is a collection of poems, Auto-Oedipal, which re-imagines the Oedipus myth. Amy also writes plays and is the poetry editor for New Welsh Review.

Paul McMenemy is the editor of Lunar Poetry. This is his first poem for children.

Rachael M Nicholas was born in Birmingham in 1987. Her work has appeared in Magma, Gigantic Sequins and The Cadaverine. In 2012 she won an Eric Gregory Award. Her first pamphlet, Somewhere Near in the Dark, was published by Eyewear Publishing in 2014.

Richard O’Brien’s second pamphlet, The Emmores, was published by the Emma Press in January 2014 and A Bloody Mess followed from Valley Press later that year. His work has featured in Poetry London, The Salt Book of Younger Poets and The Best British Poetry 2013. He is working on a PhD in contemporary verse drama. http://thescallopshell.wordpress.com

Abigail Parry worked as a toymaker for several years, and has recently completed a PhD on play in contemporary poetry. She can most commonly be found writing about beguiling animals, unhappy monsters, magic and mischief. She received an Eric Gregory Award in 2010.

Lavinia Singer edits Oxford Poetry and works at Enitharmon Press.

Jon Stone’s poems have appeared in books of sci-fi poetry, mimicry and formal adventures. He also writes manga mash-ups and odes to Batman villains, and has edited anthologies of bird poems and computer game poems, both published through Sidekick Books, which is run by the villainous alchemist Dr Fulminare. www.gojonstonego.com

Kate Wakeling lives in London and is a research fellow at Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music & Dance. Her poetry has appeared in The Best British Poetry 2014, The Rialto and Butcher’s Dog magazines among others. She is writer-in-residence with Aurora Orchestra. https://twitter.com/WakelingKate

Kate Wise lives in London, fitting poetry in around being a mum to two under-fours. She has been published in New Trad Journal, Angle, Prole and StepAway magazines and was commended in the 2013 Cafe Writers and 2014 Manchester Cathedral Poetry Competitions, and placed third in the 2014 Ware Poets competition. https://twitter.com/kwise62

Andrew Wynn Owen studies English Literature at Magdalen College, Oxford. His first pamphlet, Raspberries for the Ferry, was published by the Emma Press in 2014. Also in 2014, he was awarded Oxford University’s Newdigate and Lord Alfred Douglas prizes for poetry.

The Emma Press has launched an open call for submissions to a sea-themed poetry anthology due for release in October 2016.

The independent publisher, based in Winnersh, is inviting poets to send in up to three poems by 21st June 2015. According to the publisher’s rules, all people submitting must be a member of the Emma Press Club, whereby they must either have bought a book/ebook/set of postcards from the publisher’s website in 2015 or already have been accepted into an Emma Press publication.

The brief for submissions states: ‘We want poetry to bear witness to the ocean’s harvest and wreckage, and writers to record the sea that leaks into their lives. […] We want to read verse that follows fishing trawlers and perilous crossings, charts the Middle Passage and the Bermuda Triangle, and to hear how coastlines differ for islanders and the land-locked, migrants and the lost-at-sea.’

The Emma Press Anthology of the Sea is the latest in the publisher’s series of themed and illustrated poetry anthologies. Themes have so far included parenthood, homesickness and women’s friendships, with The Emma Press Anthology of Dance launching at the Rambert Dance Company HQ in Waterloo on Thursday 14th May from 7.30pm.

The anthology will be edited by Eve Lacey, who previously edited Furies (For Books’ Sake, 2014), an anthology of contemporary women’s poetry.

Eve Lacey said: ‘The Emma Press is expert in anthologising new writing under broad themes, and the perfect publisher to do justice to the sea’s potential for poetry. There is almost infinite scope for all manner of sea-inspired poems in this anthology and I can’t wait to read the submissions. I am especially looking forward to poetry that pushes the boundaries of nature writing and opens our eyes to new ways of seeing the sea.’

Publisher Emma Wright said: ‘We were incredibly impressed by Eve’s work on Furies, so we were delighted when she approached us with her idea for the anthology. What with Amy Key and Best Friends Forever, Sarah Hesketh and The Emma Press Anthology of Age and now Eve, we have been very lucky in finding guest editors who understand our aims as a press and embrace all of our values.’

Full details of the submissions guidelines can be found on the Submissions page, and further details about the Anthology of Dance launch can be found on the Events page.

About the Emma Press

The Emma Press is an independent publisher dedicated to producing beautiful, thought-provoking books. It was founded in 2012 in Winnersh, UK, by Emma Wright, formerly of Orion Publishing Group. In 2014, the Emma Press was shortlisted for the Michael Marks Award for poetry pamphlet publishers. In 2015, Oils (Emma Press, 2014), by Stephen Sexton, was selected as the PBS Winter Pamphlet Choice.

The Emma Press’s publishing programme features themed poetry anthologies and single-author poetry and prose pamphlets, with an ongoing engagement with the works of the Roman poet Ovid.

For more information, please contact Emma Wright at queries [at] theemmapress [dot] com

line If I Lay on my Back I Saw Nothing but Naked WomenPoems by Jacqueline Saphra

Illustrations by Mark Andrew Webber

Paperback ISBN 978-1-910139-06-6
AN EMMA PRESS PAMPHLET
Publication date: 13th November 2014
Page count: 36
Price: £10.00 (paperback)

Buy now

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* Winner of Best Collaborative Work in the 2015 Saboteur Awards *

This beautiful, full-colour picture book marries the sumptuous prose poems of Jacqueline Saphra with Mark Andrew Webber’s striking studies in the nude female form. Saphra constructs an eerie, sensuous world with her loosely narrative sequence of poems told from the perspective of a child, drawing the reader in with lush, wry descriptions of eccentric parents and step-parents. The surreal mood is complemented by Webber’s beautiful naturalistic linocut prints, which are based on speed-sketches from life-drawing classes.

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Reviews

‘This is a little beauty of a book. The size, design and vivid illustrations, together with its direct child-like voice, can make you feel as if you have a children’s picture book in your hands and that the young subject of the text is watching you, not far away. In seventeen prose poems Saphra gives us a strong sense of her parents, her step-father and three step-mothers and of the damage trickling through their story.’ — Rosie Johnston for London Grip

‘The book is full of strangely tender moments between parent and child, all of which are presented with an almost objective clarity and unemotional distance. Saphra manages to balance the narrative consistently between poignancy and hindsight, most effectively through the choreography of objects and people; their dance is a finely tuned masterpiece of her following them and they being led by her.’ – Jane Monson, Ink, Sweat and Tears

‘Full of exquisite phrase-making […] the work is by turns moving, disturbing and funny as it traces its narrative of a passion for words through terrain that’s tender, explosive and bizarre.’ – Ellen Cranitch, Poetry London

‘Jacqueline Saphra’s sequence of untitled prose poems, As I Lay on my Back I Saw Nothing but Naked Women, is a model of how production can enhance poems. There are 17 poems, in larger than usual type size, each arranged on a double page spread with an illustration by Mark Andrew Webber. The illustrations add colour and energy and, interestingly, emphasise the white spaces on these wide pages. […] though this is a satisfying book in the hand, it is a short pamphlet length to read. Thus, I read and reread it easily several times at the first sitting and it repaid each reading with new pleasures.’— Claire Crowther, Magma

The story is linear, yet darts and jumps from character to character, scene to scene, in glorious and frequently tender episodes. The result is a rich story of vibrant lives, a wonderfully original way to portray the revelations of relationships. As a reader I felt like a magpie, both eyes and imagination caught by all the shining, flashing, surprising images, greedily wanting to take and keep them.‘ — Anna Kirk for Ambit Magazine

This is a world of light and strong colour and Mark Andrew Webber’s linocut studies in the nude human form perfectly complement the tone of the text. The dark form of the nudes are set alongside blocks of jewel-like colours – yellows, pinks and blues, sometimes fragmented, sometimes whole.  In an interview with the Poetry School, Saphra described the project as a picture book for adults and, as in all successful picture books, the text and the illustrations work together to create a unified emotional effect. As you would expect from an Emma Press publication, this book is an object to cherish, to handle carefully and read over again.‘ — Alice Allen for Sabotage Reviews

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About the poet

Jacqueline SaphraJacqueline Saphra has won several awards including first prize in the Ledbury Poetry Competition. Her first pamphlet, Rock ’n’ Roll Mamma, was published by Flarestack and her first full collection, The Kitchen of Lovely Contraptions (flipped eye, 2011), was developed with funding from Arts Council England and nominated for The Aldeburgh First Collection Prize. Read more about Jacqueline on her website. [Photo: Naomi Woddis]

About the illustrator

Mark Andrew WebberReading-based artist Mark Andrew Webber works primarily in linocut printing and specialises in painstakingly-researched typographic and geometric projects, including his ‘Where in the World’ series of enormous city maps and ‘FORM’, a six-part study of line and form. In 2007 Webber was awarded a prestigious Silver Cube award from the Art Directors Club of New York and has been featured in leading design magazines including Creative Review and Blueprint Magazine. His first solo show ran from July to August at the Londonewcastle Project Space in London. Find out more about Mark’s art on his website.

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Homesickness and Exile

Edited by Rachel Piercey and Emma Wright

Illustrated by Emma Wright

Paperback ISBN 978 1 910139 02 8
Publication date: 18th September 2014
88pp / 40 poems / 10 illustrations
Price: £10 (paperback)/£5.50 (ebook)

Buy now

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How does it feel to be a foreigner? Can you choose where you call home? What if you reject your home or your home rejects you? Poets from across the world offer moving insights into the emotional pull of places in this fascinating collection of poems about the fundamental human need to belong.

This anthology is inspired by the Tristia, a collection of poems written by the Roman poet Ovid after he was banished from Rome by the Emperor for an unknown misdemeanour. Homesickness and Exile expands on Ovid’s themes and considers spiritual as well as physical exile in the modern world.

You can read an extract from the introduction over on our blog.

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Reviews

‘The work contained within the anthology wanders as freely as the many lost and homesick souls that populate its poems.  There are meditations on being a stranger, poems of longing, and songs of celebration taking great joy in the solace of home. […] The book, as one has come to expect from The Emma Press, is a beautiful artefact.  The care and dedication spent in the editorial process, and in the crafting of the poems themselves, is reflected in the elegance of the physical tome and Emma Wright’s unique and enchanting illustrations.  As something of a stateless pirate, this collection reaches out with new connections upon each reading, and I’m increasingly feeling that home is having an Emma Press book in my hands.’ — Steven Nash, Sabotage Reviews

‘This anthology contains poems about wandering, being homesick, being a stranger, a foreigner, yet also moments of belonging, of finding the self and somehow ending up right where you ought to be. The vulnerability of some of these poems are laid bare on the page. They moved me, hit a deep spot in my chest, made me smile, made me think and rethink, and in the end, made me feel connected and strangely at home.’ Durre Shahwar

A charming little blue book with a wistful boat sketching on the front, Homesickness and Exile is filled with longing, hope, history and nostalgia.‘ — Caroline Cook, the Reading Post

This is a lovingly crafted and engaging collection of poetry. The charm and variety of the work means that each page offers an unexpected perspective of the shared theme. Whilst some of the poets are established, with their poetry having been widely published, others are at a far earlier stage in their careers. Regardless, the quality is excellent. This collection is perfect for longstanding lovers of poetry, yet accessible enough to appeal to more curious newcomers to the form.‘ — Booktrust

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About the editors

Rachel and EmmaRachel Piercey (pictured, left) is a former editor at The Cadaverine magazine and a current editor at the Emma Press. She studied English Literature at St Hugh’s College, Oxford, where she won the Newdigate Prize in 2008. Her illustrated pamphlet of love poems, The Flower and the Plough, was published by the Emma Press in 2013 and her second pamphlet, Rivers Wanted, in 2014.

Emma Wright (pictured, right) studied Classics at Brasenose College, Oxford. She worked in ebook production at Orion Publishing Group before leaving to set up the Emma Press in 2012. In 2015 she toured the UK with the Myths and Monsters poetry tour for children, supported with funding from Arts Council England as part of the Lottery-funded Grants for the Arts programme. She lives in Birmingham.

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About the poets

Ivy Alvarez is the author of two poetry collections: Disturbance (Seren Books, 2013) and Mortal (Red Morning Press, 2006). A recipient of writing residencies from MacDowell Colony, Hawthornden Castle and Fundación Valparaiso, her work appears in journals and anthologies in many countries, with individual poems translated into Russian, Spanish, Japanese and Korean. Photo © Rachael Duncan.

Zeina Hashem Beck is a Lebanese poet. Her first book, To Live in Autumn (The Backwaters Press, 2014) won the 2013 Backwaters Prize, judged by Lola Haskins. Her poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Ploughshares, Nimrod, Poetry Northwest, and Mslexia, among others. She lives in Dubai with her husband and two daughters.

Alex Bell grew up in Northumberland and Dorset. She now lives and works in London, where she never feels homesick for the countryside. Her work has appeared in Magma, The Rialto and Poetry Wales.

Carole Bromley is a Creative Writing tutor at York University. Recently published in Magma, Poetry Review, Poetry News, The Interpreter’s House, The North and The Rialto, she has two pamphlets and a first collection, A Guided Tour of the Ice House, with Smith/Doorstop. Carole has won a number of first prizes including The Bridport, Yorkshire Open and Bronte Society Literary Prize. She was shortlisted in the 2014 Manchester Writing for Children Prize.

Mary Buchinger is the author of Aerialist (forthcoming with Gold Wake Press in 2015; shortlisted for the May Swenson Poetry Award, OSU Press/The Journal Wheeler Prize for Poetry and Perugia Press Prize). She received the Varoujan and Houghton Awards from the New England Poetry Club and is Associate Professor of English/Communication Studies, MCPHS University, Boston, Massachusetts. Photo © Tony Majahad.

George David Clark  teaches creative writing at Valparaiso University and his first book, Reveille, won the 2014 Miller Williams Prize. His most recent poems can be found in Alaska Quarterly Review, Antioch Review, The Believer, Blackbird, FIELD, Yale Review and elsewhere. The editor of 32 Poems, he lives in Indiana.

James Coghill has had poems published in places such as Popshot Magazine, Ink, Sweat & Tears, The Cadaverine, Lighthouse Literary Journal, Verse Kraken and Orbis. He is currently working on a pamphlet of animal/ecopoems; as such, writing about something more people shaped is a welcome holiday.

Ellie Danak is a poet with a background in researching modern Swedish crime novels and skiing off hills head first. She lives and writes in Edinburgh and divides her time between her notebooks and her toddler son. She blogs at Poetry & Pandemonium.

An Australian who lives in London, Cath Drake has been published in anthologies and literary magazines in UK, Australia and US and performs widely. In 2012, she was short-listed for the Venture Poetry Award, awarded an Arts Council England grant and was writer in residence at the Albany Arts Centre café. Cath’s pamphlet Sleeping with Rivers won the 2013 Mslexia/Seren poetry pamphlet prize and was the Poetry Book Society Summer Choice 2014.

Frank Dullaghan holds an MA with Distinction in Writing (University of South Wales). He co-founded the Essex Poetry Festival, edited Seam Poetry Magazine, and his third poetry collection, The Same Roads Back, is due out in September 2014 with Cinnamon Press. He lives in Dubai and also writes short screen and stage plays.

John Froy lives in Reading where he works as a painter decorator. He has published a collection of poems, Eggshell (Two Rivers Press, 2007), and two volumes of memoir: 70 Waterloo Road (2010) and The Art School Dance (Two Rivers Press, 2013).

Charlotte Higgins was born in Belfast and now lives in Cambridge. A previous winner of Foyle Young Poets of the Year Award (2010, commended) and SLAMbassadors (2011), she has performed in the Royal Festival Hall, at the Proms, and at Nuyorican Poetry Café. She runs Speakeasy, a Cambridge poetry night.

Holly Hopkins lives in London where she is reading an MA in Creative Writing at Royal Holloway. Holly won an Eric Gregory Award in 2011 and her debut pamphlet, Soon Every House Will Have One, won the 2014 Poetry Business Pamphlet Competition and was Poetry Book Society Pamphlet Choice.

In 2013, Australian poet Elizabeth Horne won the Tom Collins Poetry Prize and was shortlisted for the Australian Science Poetry Prize. She has been published in Australian journals including Meanjin, Famous Reporter, Blue Dog Australian Poetry and the New England Review. She is also a printmaker and children’s writer.

Anja Konig grew up in the German language and now writes in English. Her poetry has appeared in the UK and the US in magazines and anthologies such as Poetry Review, Poetry London, Magma, The Manhattan Review and Cimarron Review. Her first pamphlet, Advice for an Only Child, will be published by Flipped Eye Publishing in 2014.

Eve Lacey is the editor of Furies, an anthology of contemporary women’s poetry published in 2014. She was awarded the David Almond Fellowship in 2012 and longlisted for the Hot Key Young Writers Prize in 2013. Her poetry was published in The Emma Press Anthology of Motherhood in 2014.

Gill Learner’s poetry has been widely published since 2002, most recently in Acumen 78, Mslexia 61 and Poetry News Spring 2014. Gill has also won several awards, including the Hamish Canham Prize 2008 and the Buxton Poetry Competition 2011 & 2012. Her first collection is The Agister’s Experiment (Two Rivers Press, 2011).

Rachel Long is a writer, poet and spoken word artist based in London. She has read at the Olympic stadium and Royal Festival Hall, and has been commissioned by Apples & Snakes, SPOKE and Clayground Collective. Rachel is a proud member of international poetry collective Burn After Reading and she is currently studying an MA in Creative and Life Writing at Goldsmith’s University London.

Marissa Mazek is a Creative Writing MFA candidate at Hollins University in Virginia. Her work has appeared in Watershed Review (Spring 2014),  The Rampallian (Winter/Spring 2014), and other publications. She received an Honorable Mention in Glimmer Train’s December 2013 Fiction Open, and is an alumna of Barnard College, Columbia University.

John McCullough’s first collection The Frost Fairs (Salt, 2011) won the Polari First Book Prize for 2012.  It was a Book of the Year for both the Independent and The Poetry School, and a summer read for the Observer. He lives in Hove, and teaches creative writing for the Open University.

Cheryl Moskowitz is a US-born, UK-based, prize-winning poet, translator and novelist. Her poems have been published in literary journals including Poetry Review, Magma and Artemis. Her books include a novel, Wyoming Trail (Granta), poems for children, Can it Be About Me (Frances Lincoln), and her poetry collection The Girl is Smiling (Circle Time Press).

Selina Nwulu is a writer and poet, often inspired by global justice, protest and politics. Selina has toured nationally with Apples and Snakes and performed at an EU Environmental Human Rights Conference in Budapest. She has been published in magazines and anthologies, including In Protest: 150 Poems for Human Rights (Institute of Commonwealth Studies, 2013). Her first collection is due to be published by Burning Eye in 2015.

Richard O’Brien’s home is in Lincolnshire, though he has also lived in Oxford, Nantes, France and, currently, Stratford-upon-Avon. His work has appeared in Poetry London, The Best British Poetry 2013, and three pamphlets, including The Emmores (The Emma Press) and A Bloody Mess (Dead Ink/Valley Press), both published in 2014.

Lisa Ortiz’s poems have appeared in Best New Poets 2013, Zyzzyva, The Literary Review, and have been featured on Verse Daily. She wrote ‘Marooned’ while living in Peru, but by the time you read this she has likely returned to her home town of Santa Cruz, California.

Rachel Piercey is an editor at The Cadaverine magazine and The Emma Press. Her illustrated pamphlet of love poems, The Flower and the Plough, was published by The Emma Press in 2013 and a second pamphlet, Rivers Wanted, is forthcoming in October 2014.

Stephen Sexton lives in Belfast, where he studies at the Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry. His poems have appeared in Poetry London, The Honest Ulsterman, Poetry Ireland Review, The Ulster Tatler, and as part of the Lifeboat Series of readings based in Belfast. He was the winner of the inaugural FSNI National Poetry Competition and his first pamphlet, Oils, is publishing with The Emma Press in October 2014.

Vili Skarlopoulou is from Athens, Greece but currently lives in London. She studied classical literature in both Athens and London. Her poems have appeared in various magazines including Myths of The Near Future, The Cadaverine magazine and the Young Poets Network.

James Trevelyan grew up in the Midlands and now lives in South London. Having completed an MA in Creative Writing at Royal Holloway, his poems have been published in 14 Magazine, Cake, The Cadaverine magazine, and anthologised in Bedford Square 5. He is currently an Administrator at the Poetry Book Society.

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Raspberries for the FerryPoems by Andrew Wynn Owen

Paperback ISBN 978 0 9574596 5 6

AN EMMA PRESS PAMPHLET
Publication date: 27th March 2014
Page count: 36
Price: £6.50 (paperback)

Buy now

 

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Raspberries for the Ferry is the debut pamphlet from young poet and major new talent Andrew Wynn Owen, whose delight in the possibilities of language and form is utterly infectious. Tortoises, dancers, lovers and whales all beguile in poems which are playful, charming and frequently heartfelt, grounded in the past and bubbling with modern verve. You can read a discussion of the title poem, ‘Raspberries’, over on Poem Club.

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About the author

Andrew Wynn OwenAndrew Wynn Owen is an Examination Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford. In 2015, he received an Eric Gregory Award and, in 2014, Oxford University’s Newdigate Prize. His first poetry pamphlet, Raspberries for the Ferry, was published by the Emma Press in 2014, followed by a collaboration with John Fuller, AWOL, in 2015.

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Reviews

‘He negotiates rhyme, rhythm and structure as nimbly as Houdini negotiated a straitjacket; his ideas are no more boxed in by the shapes which hold them than Escher was limited by the lines of a staircase. At every turn, his language derives a kind of glee from evading its captors, chafing and fretting at its formal constraints until the edges of the lines spit sparks.’ — Richard O’Brien, in his introduction to Raspberries for the Ferry

‘My over-riding sensation when reading the poems was one of often delighted surprise. Wynn Owen is bold and witty, revelling in unusual connections.’ David Clarke for Sidekick Books Reviews

‘It is an overtly literary collection – with poems imagined between Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, as well as references to classical mythology in abundance – yet there is something youthful and earnest about the voices used throughout which transports it somewhere new entirely.’ — Alexa Turnpenney for Cadaverine magazine

‘It is in his most deeply emotional poems, in which his talent most truly shines. “The Lay of the Lake,” “Your Smile,” and the pair of letter-poems between the poets Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, to name a few, are touching and well-executed without delving into the saccharinity or stodginess of its forebears.’ — C. A. LaRue for Sabotage Reviews

     

The debut pamphlet from Andrew Wynn Owen. With an introduction by Richard O'Brien.

* Eric Gregory Award Winner 2015 *

Paperback ISBN 978-0-9574596-5-6 Publication date: 27th March 2014 Page count: 36 Read-more-button→ Read more

** The webshop is on holiday! If you order some books now, I'll dispatch them on 25th July ** Dismiss